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Called ‘Nine-Nights’ because it is traditionally held on the ninth-night’ after a death, the spirit of the deceased is bade farewell and sent on its way.  It is customary throughout the Caribbean to play games, drink and sing songs. Here traditional drums are being played by elders within a community.

Jamaica, 2002 © Ishmahil
Ganja fields are generally planted in the countryside. Farmers often have hidden marijuana fields as a means of supplementing their incomes from other produce. Note how this farmer has used trees which surround his crop as a shield from prying eyes.

Jamaica, 2002 © Ishmahil
Public transport is very often personalised.

Panama, 1999 © Ishmahil
Having been robbed at knifepoint many times, this Peruvian taxi driver believes he has found the ideal solution by welding a metal cage into his car.

Peru, 2005 © Yannis Mendez
Cuba

Cuba, 2005 © Ishmahil
Mortimmo Planno was Bob Marley’s spiritual teacher, he was also one of the early pioneers of the dreadlocks. Here he holds a photograph of himself escorting Emperor Haile Selassie from his plane on a visit to Jamaica in 1966.

Jamaica, 2001 © Ishmahil
Cuba

Cuba, 2005
© Ishmahil
Rastaman

Jamaica, 2001 © Ishmahil
Cuba

Cuba 2005 © Ishmahil
The street graffiti of Jamaica is almost always political. Here PNP (Peoples National Party) has been sprayed on this street vendors stall. The Peoples National Party are currently the ruling party in Jamaica, the party is denoted by the colour red.

Jamaica, 2001 © Ishmahil
Copyright © 2005 riceNpeas


Street stalls litter the hills and gullies of Jamaica, selling everyday provisions and what the locals call 'hard food': Yams, potatoes and green bananas etc.

Jamaica, 2001 © Ishmahil
The majority of funerals in Jamaica are similar to this one, whereby the deceased is buried outside the family home. Note the number of tombs on this site; they will all be members of the same family. Disputes often arise as to where a deceased should be buried with the deceased of their spouse’s family or their own.

Jamaica, 2002 © Ishmahil
It was the first time this six year old had seen a dead person. He was shaken by the experience and asked “Will he be coming back alive again’.

Jamaica, 2002 © Yannis Mendez

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The street graffiti of Jamaica is almost always political. Here a  JLP (Jamaican Labour Party) supporter wears the colours of his party, green. The wall slogan reads: ‘Seaga We Love You’,

Jamaica, 2001 © Ishmahil